At Backcountry Experience, we want to be heard loud and clear that we have strong opinions about Colorado’s environmental health and the policies that influence it.

Stokes Poké partners with Conservation Colorado because we agree that the environment, economy, and social justice are inseparable.

This Colorado Gives Day help us turn our goals into action! Learn what your donation will help us accomplish for our air, lands, water, and communities.

DENVER, CO — Conservation Colorado, the state’s largest environmental group, today reiterated its solidarity with recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and support for partners working on behalf of immigrants in our state and nation. The announcement comes on the same day that the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the legality of President Trump’s 2017 decision to rescind the program.

DACA has protected 17,000 Colorado residents and the economic impact to our state of removing DACA workers would be approximately $857 billion.

Juan Gallegos, Protégete Director at Conservation Colorado, is available for interviews today and made the following statement:

As a DACA recipient, I know how important this program is for young people to achieve their American dream. Deferred action has allowed me the opportunity to gain lawful employment in the U.S. It has allowed me to pursue my dreams and to protect the environment and planet for future generations by supporting the training of environmental leaders from Latino community members.

Working for an organization that organizes Latino and immigrant communities, I see firsthand how DACA recipients contribute to our movement, to their families, to our society, and to our economy.

Our Protégete organizers are often working with mixed-status and immigrant families where it is common for some of the young family members to have DACA. We have seen the effects on community, when people trust their government. As that same government acts on the enforcement of a broken immigration system — and against DACA recipients — I fear that our gains in civic participation will be eroded by a president and administration intent on targeting the same folks who already live on the frontlines of many injustices. We will keep a close eye on the Supreme Court decision because we know that for many young climate champions and their family members #HomeIsHere.

The hard work you put in to organize, advocate, and make your voice heard made a difference. Our conservation movement is stronger than ever.

New polling validates what we’ve known for years: Coloradans value protecting public health and safety, the environment, and wildlife over profits for the oil and gas industry.

To me, public lands stewardship means dismantling barriers so that all people may access the protected landscapes in perpetuity. Which is why I support the CORE Act.

The conservation community — which has traditionally excluded Indigenous voices — needs to recognize tribal outreach as a top priority as we strive to achieve our values of inclusion and intersectionality.

We took to the streets to answer this question and see what else Coloradans know — or ought to know — about methane.

CARBONDALE, COLORADO – Today, Conservation Colorado, the state’s largest statewide environmental advocacy organization, announced the opening of a new Roaring Fork Valley office based in Carbondale to serve this ecologically unique and politically important region.

Central Mountains Organizer Erin Riccio released the following statement in response:

“As Conservation Colorado’s organizer in the region, I’m excited to bring the voices of my neighbors along the Roaring Fork and Colorado River valleys to the State Capitol and other decision-making spaces. Together we can fight climate change, protect our lands, waterways, and wildlife, and stand up against powerful interests.

“Calling this area ‘home’ is a dream come true.”

The Roaring Fork Valley is already a conservation leader, including:

  • The only municipalities in our state — Glenwood Springs and Aspen — to be powered 100 percent by renewable energy;
  • Cancellation of 18 oil and gas leases along the Thompson Divide, an important landscape renowned for its hunting and recreation opportunities;
  • Creation of the Crystal River Management Plan to better manage water usage and enhance the ecological integrity of the river; and,
  • A goal to electrify one-third of the Roaring Fork Valley Transportation Authority’s bus fleet.

“I’m thrilled that Conservation Colorado has established a permanent presence in the Roaring Fork Valley,” said Jacque Whitsitt, the Mayor of Basalt. “Their focus on state and national policy will be a great asset to the robust conservation community that already calls this area home.”

Riccio, a fluent Spanish-speaker, will work with local citizens and leaders to capitalize on this progress, including:

  • Conserving our public lands that support a high quality of life and booming outdoor economy by passing the CORE Act;
  • Protecting our unique communities from the health and safety hazards of oil and gas activities through continued engagement with the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission;
  • Addressing climate change by implementing the Climate Action Plan to reduce statewide carbon emissions by 50% by 2030 and 90% by 2050; and,
  • Ensuring our rivers are healthy and flowing with full funding of the Colorado Water Plan.