DENVER, CO — Conservation Colorado, the state’s largest environmental group, today reiterated its solidarity with recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and support for partners working on behalf of immigrants in our state and nation. The announcement comes on the same day that the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the legality of President Trump’s 2017 decision to rescind the program.

DACA has protected 17,000 Colorado residents and the economic impact to our state of removing DACA workers would be approximately $857 billion.

Juan Gallegos, Protégete Director at Conservation Colorado, is available for interviews today and made the following statement:

As a DACA recipient, I know how important this program is for young people to achieve their American dream. Deferred action has allowed me the opportunity to gain lawful employment in the U.S. It has allowed me to pursue my dreams and to protect the environment and planet for future generations by supporting the training of environmental leaders from Latino community members.

Working for an organization that organizes Latino and immigrant communities, I see firsthand how DACA recipients contribute to our movement, to their families, to our society, and to our economy.

Our Protégete organizers are often working with mixed-status and immigrant families where it is common for some of the young family members to have DACA. We have seen the effects on community, when people trust their government. As that same government acts on the enforcement of a broken immigration system — and against DACA recipients — I fear that our gains in civic participation will be eroded by a president and administration intent on targeting the same folks who already live on the frontlines of many injustices. We will keep a close eye on the Supreme Court decision because we know that for many young climate champions and their family members #HomeIsHere.

Sportsmen, veterans, recreation advocates, outdoor businesses and conservationists respond to historic legislation to protect 400,000 acres of public lands

DENVER, CO — Conservation, recreation and wildlife groups across Colorado welcomed a vote in Congress today that helped move important public lands legislation from the U.S. House of Representatives on to the U.S. Senate. The Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy Act (CORE Act) is needed to safeguard more than 400,000 acres in the Centennial State and ensure future generations have access to the state’s wildest lands and historic areas, like Camp Hale.

Colorado Representatives Joe Neguse, Diana DeGette, Ed Perlmutter and Jason Crow joined the majority in a bipartisan 227 – 182 vote for passage. Representatives Doug Lamborn, Ken Buck and Scott Tipton voted against, despite the recently released polling indicating that strong majorities of Rep. Tipton’s constituents support the measure and strong local support from counties and towns.

As the bill moves to the U.S. Senate, it is more important than ever that Colorado’s statewide elected officials stand together and support the CORE Act. Sen. Cory Gardner, who has not yet taken a position on this important Colorado legislation, should join Sen. Michael Bennet in sponsoring the bill.

The following are quotes from a number of organizations and stakeholders who have been working for decades to advance conservation efforts in Colorado, including protections for 400,000 acres in the San Juans, Thompson Divide, Continental Divide, Curecanti, and the historic WWII training grounds at Camp Hale: 

“Coloradans love our lands and have been working for years to protect these popular, iconic and historic landscapes. Thank you to our environmental champions — Representatives Neguse, DeGette, Crow and Perlmutter — for advancing the CORE Act today. Senator Gardner should join Senator Bennet in supporting this is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to safeguard nearly half a million acres of Colorado’s public lands.” — Kelly Nordini, Executive Director, Conservation Colorado

“Protecting Camp Hale and the surrounding area is way to honor generations of veterans, from World War II to Operation Enduring Freedom. Our public lands and the freedoms they represent define our nation, and I fought to defend that. Today I continue that fight by working to preserve Camp Hale and I hope Senator Gardner will join me and my fellow veterans.” — Bradley Noone, 10th Mountain Division Veteran.

“As a small business owner in the hunting community, I support the CORE act as a needed step in protecting our public lands in perpetuity. The next generation of hunters will have access to Wilderness Areas rich in biodiversity. This will enable a vital connection to our Colorado lands.” — Mahting Putelis, Co-Founder & CEO of Hunt to Eat

“This vote is the culmination of a decade of community dialogue and compromise. With this milestone, it’s time for the Senate to have a hearing on this bill and move it forward.” — Scott Fetchenhier, San Juan County Commissioner, Owner and Operator of Fetch’s Mining and Mercantile Company in Silverton

“We have been working to permanently protect the Thompson Divide for over a decade, and today’s vote is a significant step toward the finish line. The Thompson Divide has galvanized our community like no other issue, and we are grateful to Representative Neguse and Senator Bennet for championing this landscape that is so crucial to our economic livelihood and way of life. We hope Senator Gardner will join us and Senator Bennet to get this across the finish line in the Senate.” — Curtis Kaufman, Board President, Thompson Divide Coalition 

“Sportsmen and women celebrate the passage of the CORE Act in the U.S. House, and we thank Representative Neguse and Senator Bennet for their leadership on this bill. There’s a direct link from large swathes of land, protected from development, to healthy populations of game and fish. Wildlife and fish, in turn, attract hunters and anglers like me who help support our local economies. Now, we urge Senator Gardner to co-sponsor the CORE Act to pass a bipartisan bill in the Senate.” — Craig Grother, Regional Director, Central Western Slope, Backcountry Hunters and Anglers

“As an outfitter guide and storefront business owner, I couldn’t be more pleased with today’s passage of the CORE Act in the House. My guide service operates in several counties benefiting from the protection of wild landscapes and rivers in this legislation. I extend my deep appreciation to Representative Neguse and Senator Bennet and call on Senator Gardner to consider the opinion of the majority of his constituents and co-sponsor the CORE Act. The CORE Act is good for rural economies, communities, recreation, and natural resources.” — Tim Patterson, owner, RIGS Fly Shop & Guide Service 

Coloradans love getting outside and getting after it on public lands. Many of us identify as outdoor enthusiasts and conservationists, and in western Colorado a majority support additional wilderness. Patagonia thanks Congressman Neguse and Senator Bennet for their leadership on this legislation and urges Senator Gardner to continue a long bipartisan tradition to support public lands in Colorado and to vote yes on the CORE Act.” — Mark Stevens, district environmental manager, Patagonia

“As a Ridgway resident for over four decades and a local rancher, I applaud the passage of the CORE Act in the House. Colorado’s public lands are essential to my family as our grazing permit is located within the Whitehouse Addition.  I rely on healthy and protected lands and waters for my business to succeed, as do my fellow ranchers who graze livestock on the Thompson Divide. In addition, both my father and uncle trained at Camp Hale as part of the storied 10th Mountain Division.  Preserving Camp Hale honors veterans and their families and protects a landscape that constitutes a piece of our country’s cultural and military history. Thank you Representative Neguse and Senator Bennet! I encourage Senator Gardner to co-sponsor the CORE Act in the Senate.” — Liza Clarke, Owner, Ferguson Family Ranches

“The CORE Act really gets at the core of Colorado values – protecting critical waterways and habitats, providing inspiring outdoor recreation opportunities like the Continental Divide Trail, and honoring the unique history of the American West. Today’s passage of the CORE Act through the House should be a proud moment for the many Coloradans who have worked to protect the Continental Divide and other invaluable landscapes for more than a decade. We are grateful for the leadership of Representative Neguse and Senator Bennet in moving the CORE Act forward, and hope to see Senator Gardner join them in this crucial effort to protect some of Colorado’s most special places. — Teresa Martinez, Executive Director, Continental Divide Trail Coalition

“Eagle County applauds the passage of the CORE Act in the House of Representatives today. This important public lands bill includes the designation of one of the County’s Crown Jewels, Camp Hale, as a National Historic Landscape. The heroism of the 10th Mountain Division troops and their contributions to the skiing world are memorialized in this Act. The CORE Act also preserves important wildlife habitat and environment in Eagle and Summit Counties. This bipartisan effort has included local input over many years and we are hopeful that this work will result in passage in the Senate as well.” — Kathy Chandler-Henry, Commissioner, Eagle County

“We are thrilled with today’s House vote in favor of the CORE Act. Local communities like Ouray County have been working to advance these protections for decades, and we couldn’t ask for a better piece of legislation. The CORE Act protects critical wildlife migration corridors and habitat, valuable watersheds, and unspoiled wild places which all benefit our rural economies. We applaud the leadership from Congressman Neguse and Senator Bennet, and we urge Senator Gardner to join Senator Bennet as a co-sponsor to pass the CORE Act in the Senate in the 116th Congress”.Robyn Cascade, Northern San Juan Chapter Leader, Great Old Broads for Wilderness

“Today the US House of Representatives affirmed what folks in western Colorado know, protecting the Thompson Divide and Continental Divide landscapes is the right thing to do. For over a decade Wilderness Workshop and local communities have advocated for the protection of these special places, most recently as part of the CORE Act. This legislation is the culmination of years of engagement, discussion and compromise among a diverse and bi-partisan set of stakeholders who have come together to work on a common goal. Now that the House has acted and listened to the voices of locals, I hope our delegation can work together, just as our communities have, to ensure that Thompson Divide and Continental Divide are permanently protected.” — Will Roush, Executive Director, Wilderness Workshop

“Members of Ridgway Ouray Community Council (ROCC) have spent endless hours over the last decade collaborating with diverse stakeholders to support the proposal for the expansion of the Mount Sneffels Wilderness Area. We are pleased and excited to have the San Juan Mountains proposal included in the CORE Act. The CORE Act recognizes the need to protect the natural resources located on our public lands while simultaneously benefiting our local economy.” — Jim Stephenson, Public Lands Chair, Ridgway-Ouray Community Council

“We’ve been waiting 40 years to complete wilderness protection of Mount Sneffels and some of the most spectacular wildlands in the San Juan Mountains. We greatly appreciate Rep. Joe Neguse’s leadership, and we await Sen. Cory Gardner finally taking up the baton to move wilderness protections in the San Juans across the finish line in the Senate.” — Mark Pearson, Executive Director, San Juan Citizens Alliance

“The CORE Act represents a diverse set of beloved and ecologically important landscapes across Colorado. Today’s House passage of the CORE Act is a huge cause for celebration for our community in Southwest Colorado, which has been working for over a decade to protect the iconic vistas of our San Juan Mountains. We are grateful for the vision and leadership of Congressman Neguse and Senator Bennet for recognizing the value of the places that we hold dear, and working to protect our health, our economy, and our future. — Lexi Tuddenham, Executive Director, Sheep Mountain Alliance

“Colorado deserves the protections afforded by the CORE Act. Thanks to Senator Bennet and Congressman Neguse for driving the bill forward. The climbing community deeply appreciates the efforts of many stakeholders and partners to protect iconic Colorado landscapes, including Camp Hale, for future generations. We are hopeful that Senator Gardner will help move the bill through the Senate.” — Erik Murdock, Policy Director, Access Fund

The CORE Act demonstrates that protected public lands are our common ground. It strengthens a growing recreation-based economy, and it protects important recreation assets and wildlife habitat for future generations. We applaud Senator Bennet and Congressman Neguse for championing this important bill, and hope today’s passage in the House of Representatives is only the beginning.” — Kirsten Blackburn, Program Manager, The Conservation Alliance 

“Coloradans love public lands and want to see more of them protected especially in the face of a changing climate and the nature crisis. Conservationists, ranchers and sportsmen around Colorado celebrate the vote by the House and turn our attention to the Senate. Senator Cory Gardner is the only Senator from Colorado in the last half-century who has not sponsored wilderness legislation. As Colorado’s only member on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, it’s time for Senator Gardner to heed his constituents’ calls and work with Senator Bennet to get the CORE Act across the finish line.” — Jim Ramey, Colorado state director for The Wilderness Society. 

“Today’s vote marks a major step for the future of public lands in Colorado. Our national parks, wilderness areas and other public lands are cherished for their natural beauty, cultural heritage, and the recreational and economic benefits they bring to local communities. With local stakeholder support at the forefront of this process, the CORE Act achieves meaningful protections for these lands now and for future generations. We are thankful to Congressman Neguse for his leadership in championing this legislation and urge the Senate to take up the bill in short order.” —Tracy Coppola, Colorado Program Manager, National Parks Conservation Association 

“Among the thousands of acres of precious wilderness that the CORE Act would protect is Camp Hale, an important site in U.S. and Sierra Club history. Camp Hale is where the Army’s 10th Mountain Division, including Sierra Club’s first executive director, David Brower, trained to fight Nazi Germany in the Italian Alps in World War II. As a combat veteran of the 10th Mountain myself, I know how important it is to protect this beautiful and significant land from logging and fossil fuel extraction.” –– Rob Vessels, Sierra Club Military Outdoors Campaign Manager 

“Today’s vote in favor of the CORE Act is celebrated by all who have worked tirelessly to protect the San Juan Mountain landscapes vital to the communities of Western Colorado. Local voices have crafted this legislation over the course of a decade and we appreciate the leadership of Congressman Neguse for moving the vision of the CORE Act forward. Vibrant rural economies depend upon the careful stewardship of our wildlands and we ask Senator Gardner to join Senator Bennet as a co-sponsor to pass the CORE Act in the Senate.” — Steve Allerton, President, Western Colorado Alliance

“Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship is very pleased to endorse the Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy Act. Preservation of the wide variety of lands represented in the CORE Act shows that Conservation is truly Conservative. This was confirmed by a recent poll of Colorado’s third Congressional District that found two-thirds of voters support the designations in the CORE Act and an overwhelming 85% of Republicans surveyed said that public lands are important to the local economy.” — Steve Bonowski, Colorado-based board member, Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship

“The CORE Act represents a modern, collaborative, community-driven approach to bike-friendly public land protection and IMBA is excited with the progress this bill is making in Congress. For over a decade, IMBA has worked with local mountain bike groups and alongside many conservation and business partners to develop the diverse protections included in the bill. As a result, the CORE Act will not only preserve our public lands but will protect the treasured, high-alpine bike rides, and ensure future mountain bike trail opportunities are possible in areas managed for high quality recreation.” — Dave Wiens, Executive Director of the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) 

“The AAC strongly supports the CORE Act. The bill defends countless outdoor recreation opportunities, safeguards water resources, and preserves key public lands. The protections in the Act also offer the benefit of climate change mitigation through land conservation. Thank you, Senator Bennet and Congressman Neguse, for championing this important conservation measure. The climbing community is hopeful that the bill will successfully and swiftly navigate the Senate and protect important pieces of the climbing landscape.” Taylor Luneau, Policy Manager, American Alpine Club (AAC)

Joint ad pushes Sen. Gardner to stand up for Colorado’s clean air and climate, not corporate polluters

DENVER — This week, Conservation Coloradothe state’s largest environmental advocacy organizationand the grassroots organization Rocky Mountain Values launched a new television commercial that pushes Sen. Cory Gardner to support policy and funding to protect our environment and clean air. The ad comes two weeks after Senator Gardner’s recent vote that will repeal important federal progress on clean air policy and reflects the growing frustration that Colorado families have with politicians like Senator Cory Gardner, who acts in favor of special interests.

The effort is a part of Conservation Colorado’s new seven-figure accountability effort urging Senator Gardner to stand up for Coloradans who want clean air and a healthy climate, not for big corporate polluters. In addition to the new television commercial, the campaign also includes on-the-ground organizing in Aurora, Fort Collins, Greeley and Pueblo and other paid communications to educate Coloradans about Gardner’s record to get him to vote in favor of environmental protection.

“Senator Cory Gardner told us he’d protect Colorado’s clean air but went to Washington and helped dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to combat air pollution,” said Kelly Nordini, Executive Director of Conservation Colorado. “Colorado is at the forefront of climate impacts, and our state is a national leader in addressing the climate crisis. Unfortunately, Senator Gardner’s record shows he has been more willing to do what special interests and lobbyists in Washington want than to listen to his constituents back home. Senator Gardner must step up to change that.”

“Coloradans, like all Americans, value clean air,” said Alvina Vasquez, Executive Director of Rocky Mountain Values. “Less than two weeks ago Senator Gardner took a vote to block the Clean Power Plan, which would have stopped corporate polluters from dirtying our air—proving once again that he will continue taking votes that hurt Colorado. We hoped that Senator Gardner would stand by his promise to protect our environment, but instead, he continues his pattern of broken promises and bad votes. We need Senator Gardner, and all of our elected officials, to prioritize Coloradans’ clean air now. ”

In Washington, Sen. Gardner helped dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to combat air pollution, allowing power plants to burn coal waste without complying with clean air rules. And while Coloradans’ health suffered as a result, Sen. Gardner raked in the cash—including more than $1.4 million in campaign contributions from the oil and gas industry. That investment continues to pay dividends for big corporate polluters. And just this month, Sen. Gardner voted to allow Trump’s repeal of the Clean Power Plan to move forward, paving the way for coal plants to stay open longer and blocking progress for wind and solar power—energy sources that Coloradans overwhelmingly support.

“Frontline communities can’t write big checks like big polluters, but we can organize,” said Juan Gallegos, director of Protégete. “Latinx Coloradans deserve a seat at the table and for Senator Gardner to listen to us, vote with us, and put Colorado on a path to a clean energy future.”

CARBONDALE, COLORADO – Today, Conservation Colorado, the state’s largest statewide environmental advocacy organization, announced the opening of a new Roaring Fork Valley office based in Carbondale to serve this ecologically unique and politically important region.

Central Mountains Organizer Erin Riccio released the following statement in response:

“As Conservation Colorado’s organizer in the region, I’m excited to bring the voices of my neighbors along the Roaring Fork and Colorado River valleys to the State Capitol and other decision-making spaces. Together we can fight climate change, protect our lands, waterways, and wildlife, and stand up against powerful interests.

“Calling this area ‘home’ is a dream come true.”

The Roaring Fork Valley is already a conservation leader, including:

  • The only municipalities in our state — Glenwood Springs and Aspen — to be powered 100 percent by renewable energy;
  • Cancellation of 18 oil and gas leases along the Thompson Divide, an important landscape renowned for its hunting and recreation opportunities;
  • Creation of the Crystal River Management Plan to better manage water usage and enhance the ecological integrity of the river; and,
  • A goal to electrify one-third of the Roaring Fork Valley Transportation Authority’s bus fleet.

“I’m thrilled that Conservation Colorado has established a permanent presence in the Roaring Fork Valley,” said Jacque Whitsitt, the Mayor of Basalt. “Their focus on state and national policy will be a great asset to the robust conservation community that already calls this area home.”

Riccio, a fluent Spanish-speaker, will work with local citizens and leaders to capitalize on this progress, including:

  • Conserving our public lands that support a high quality of life and booming outdoor economy by passing the CORE Act;
  • Protecting our unique communities from the health and safety hazards of oil and gas activities through continued engagement with the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission;
  • Addressing climate change by implementing the Climate Action Plan to reduce statewide carbon emissions by 50% by 2030 and 90% by 2050; and,
  • Ensuring our rivers are healthy and flowing with full funding of the Colorado Water Plan.

Application for school districts to apply for funding for clean buses opens October 7th

DENVER – Today, Conservation Colorado, the state’s largest statewide environmental advocacy organization, released Cleaner Air for Denver with Electric School Buses. The new report, by VEIC Research, finds that replacing diesel buses with electric buses will result in more than $100,000 in savings on maintenance and fuel costs and cut harmful pollution.

The report arrives as Colorado school districts prepare to apply to this round of the Regional Air Quality Council’s “Alt Fuels Colorado” Program — which is funded through the multi-million dollar VW settlement with Colorado — opens on October 7th and runs through November 8th. Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is administering over $68.7 million in funds as part of the settlement, including $18 million to replace and scrap diesel school buses. 

“Every day, kids across across the state are exposed to harmful air pollution from diesel bus fumes,” said Juan Gallegos, Protégete Program Director for Conservation Colorado. “This new report shows that electric school buses will deliver cleaner air to our communities today as we move toward clean, renewable electricity. And in an era of tight budgets, our leaders will be thrilled to know that they can deliver these benefits while saving money. This report is a call to action for school districts, especially those with majority Latinx students, to take action now and apply for the VW settlement money to replace their bus fleets.” 

Specifically, the report finds that:

  • With each bus replaced, DPS will see a total of $112,353 in fuel and maintenance savings over the lifetime of the vehicle. 
  • And for each bus replaced, there are $13,044 in societal benefits from the reduced air pollution. 
  • Electric buses produce less nitrous oxide (NOx) and greenhouse gases (GHG) than new and existing diesel buses, even when including upstream impacts from electricity generation and diesel refining.
  • Denver’s grid is getting cleaner so electric buses will offer even cleaner operation in the future.

Denver Public Schools (DPS) is the largest and most populated school district in the state and is a leader in sustainability practices. DPS is one of the few school districts that has a climate change plan.

“We support the efforts of the DPS Sustainability Office and Conservation Colorado, and value the findings from this report,” said Albert Samora, Executive Director of DPS Transportation Services. “Our team has begun to look at alternatives to diesel buses and will incorporate the findings of this report as we progress with our analysis and planning for the future.”

“VEIC was thrilled to work with Denver Public Schools, with the support of Conservation Colorado, to identify a pathway toward a cleaner bus fleet,” said Jennifer Wallace-Brodeur, Director of Clean Transportation at VEIC. “Investing VW Settlement dollars in Denver’s school transportation will yield long term benefits for children’s health and we’re excited to see Denver advancing this important work.” 

“Every time we get on a diesel school bus we’re putting our health in jeopardy,” said Joyce Lopis, a DPS student attending Vista Academy High School in Green Valley Ranch. “Transitioning buses to electric will help reduce hospital bills, absent days, and air pollution. We have the right to breathe clean air without putting our health in danger.”

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Just last week, Colorado’s AQCC voted to adopt a Zero Emission Vehicle standard which will bring help Coloradans breathe easier and bring more EVs to CO. 

DENVER — Governor Jared Polis today announced an executive order to protect iconic Colorado wildlife and the landscapes they call home, aimed at conserving western landscapes and big game species for future generations. Gov. Polis’ order means Colorado will prioritize, coordinate and focus on protecting the traditional migration corridors of Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, mountain goats, bighorn sheep and moose.

Specifically, the executive order directs:

  • Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) to compile a status report of wildlife migration and associated science by the end of the calendar year;
  • Colorado Department of Natural Resources to identify policy, regulatory or legislative opportunities to ensure the ongoing conservation of seasonal habitat and migration corridors;
  • CPW to incorporate the importance of migration corridors into public education and outreach efforts; and,
  • Colorado Department of Transportation to enable safe wildlife passage and reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions.

The order will remain in effect until May 1, 2023 unless modified or rescinded prior to that date.

Conservation groups released the following statements in response:

“The health of our wild spaces and wildlife are a measure of the health of our state. Governor Polis campaigned on a pledge to ‘keep Colorado wild.’ Today’s executive order is a first step in delivering on that promise to ensure that Colorado remains wild for future generations.”

Kelly Nordini, executive director, Conservation Colorado

“Colorado’s wildlife are a key part of our state’s heritage and our outdoor way of life. This executive order will help Colorado balance our state’s rapid growth with the increasing need to safeguard our wildlife by helping to keep their habitats and corridors protected and connected. We applaud Governor Polis for taking action and look forward to continued partnership to enact this measure.”

Rachael Hamby, Western lands policy analyst, Western Resource Advocates

“These wild places are vital for birds to thrive, taking cover in the winter and stopping over as they migrate. The protections that Governor Polis has set in motion through this Order will benefit many species and set important standards throughout the state.”

Nada Culver, Vice President for Public Lands, National Audubon Society

“The Colorado Sierra Club applauds the Governor for taking bold action to protect wildlife and our Colorado heritage. Thanks to Governor Polis, Colorado is taking key steps to better understand and protect the historical migration pathways of the animals.”

Jim Alexee, director, Colorado Sierra Club

“We humans share this beautiful state with the wildlife, plants, insects, and birds that are part of nature. The efforts of Governor Polis to protect the wildlife and their habitats through the designation and maintenance of wildlife corridors will enhance the quality of life for us all. These corridors will ensure that future generations will experience the rich diversity of animal life that we do.”

Sherry Schenk, Public Lands Committee member, Western Colorado Alliance

“Colorado’s leadership in advocating for protection of wildlife corridors is more important than ever before . In southwest Colorado, the most critical wildlife corridor for lynx in the state is at risk from a massive real estate development atop Wolf Creek Pass. We look forward to working with state agencies to make the Governor’s vision a reality.”

Mark Pearson, executive director, San Juan Citizens Alliance

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